COLUMBUS, Ohio (10-25-18) – The Ohio High School Athletic Association Board of Directors held its regularly scheduled October meeting Thursday morning at the OHSAA office. The following are highlights from the meeting. Complete meeting minutes will be posted at OHSAA.org.

  • The Board was updated on the schedule and format of the OHSAA football playoffs and state championship games. Of note, all playoff games during the first four rounds will kick off at 7:00 p.m. Division I, II, III and VI games will be on Fridays. Division IV, V and VII games will be on Saturdays. More information and the complete postseason schedule are posted at https://bit.ly/2OteYRe. The OHSAA will determine the date and game-time assignments for the state championship games after the results of the state semifinal games are known on Nov. 23-24.
  • By a 7-0 vote, the Board approved a proposal from the Ohio Association of Track and Cross Country Coaches (OATCCC) to add two at-large state qualifiers in each of the five field events. Last year, the OHSAA added two at-large state qualifiers in each of the running events.
  • Since the Board’s last meeting, 35 member schools were penalized for committing infractions of OHSAA bylaws or sports regulations. The list of infractions and penalties is always included in the complete meeting minutes, but media members may request the list in advance from Tim Stried, OHSAA Director of Communications, at tstried@ohsaa.org.
  • The Board approved the tournament regulations for the OHSAA’s winter sports. The regulations will be posted on each of the winter sport pages at OHSAA.org.
  • The OHSAA has nominated Bill Hosket for the NFHS (National Federations of State High School Associations) Hall of Fame. Selections will be made next year. Bill led Dayton Belmont to the 1963-64 OHSAA Class AA (big-school) state basketball championship before helping Ohio State win the Big Ten Conference and reach the NCAA Final Four in 1968. He also played on the U.S. Basketball Team that won an Olympic Gold Medal in Mexico City in 1968 and played on the NBA World Champion New York Knicks in 1970. Recognized for numerous academic and athletic achievements, among his honors include selection into the charter class of the Ohio Basketball Hall of Fame. Bill currently is a principal with Hosket Ulen Insurance Solutions in Dublin, Ohio.

UPDATE ON OHSAA INFRACTIONS

(For October 25, 2018, Board of Directors Meeting)

The OHSAA imposed the following penalties against 35 schools that violated OHSAA bylaws or sports regulations:

  1. Grove City Christian Middle School had a student-athlete in boys middle school soccer violate Bylaw 3-5-1, Student Participation and Physical Examination Forms, when the school permitted the athlete to participate prior to submitting the necessary athletic participation forms. In accordance with Bylaw 3, Administrative Responsibility and Institution Control, the school has been fined $150. 
  1. Lancaster High School had an assistant football coach violate General Sports Regulation/Media Regulations Section 3B, Coaches’ and Participants’ Comments to the News Media, when he publicly criticized officials. In accordance with Bylaw 11, Penalties, the coach was suspended for the next regular season varsity football contest and was fined $150.
  1. Springfield Catholic Central High School had a girls varsity assistant soccer coach violate General Sports Regulation 14.2, Ejection for Unsporting Conduct (Disqualification for unsporting conduct or flagrant violation), when the coach failed vacate the vicinity of the playing area after being ejected. In accordance with the Sport Regulation, the school must forfeit the contest where the coach failed to comply with the ejection policy. This same coach also violated Bylaw 6-1-2, Requirements for Coaching, and General Sport Regulation 4, Failure to Acquire a Pupil Activity Permit, when he failed to obtain a Pupil Activity Program/Coaching Permit in a timely manner. In accordance with General Sport Regulation 4, the school has been fined $250. 
  1. Columbus Independence High School had nine student-athletes in boys varsity soccer, one student-athlete in junior varsity volleyball and one student-athlete in girls varsity tennis violate Bylaw 4-8-1, International Students. However, all the students met Exception 1 to the Bylaw (parent’s living in the district) but the school permitted the students to participate prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the students retroactively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4-1-1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  1. Mt. Blanchard Riverdale High School had a student-athlete in boys varsity golf violate Sports Regulation 7.2.2, Participating in Non-Interscholastic Programs- Individual Sports, when the student-athlete participated in a non-interscholastic golf outing while a member of the school team.  In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the student ineligible for the school’s next two regular season contests. Furthermore, in accordance with Golf Sports Regulation 2.4, Non-Interscholastic Date, the student was also ruled ineligible for the 2018 OHSAA postseason tournament because his participation in the non-interscholastic golf outing took place without an approved waiver after the September 4 non-interscholastic date.
  1. Findlay Liberty-Benton High School had a student-athlete in boys varsity golf violate Sports Regulation 7.2.2, Participating in Non-Interscholastic Programs- Individual Sports, when the student-athlete participated in a non-interscholastic golf outing while a member of the school team.  In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the student ineligible for the school’s next two regular season contests. Furthermore, in accordance with Golf Sports Regulation 2.4, Non-Interscholastic Date, the student was also ruled ineligible for the 2018 OHSAA postseason tournament because his participation in the non-interscholastic golf outing took place without an approved waiver after the September 4 non-interscholastic date.
  1. Wheelersburg High School had seven student-athletes in girls junior varsity/varsity soccer violate Sports Regulation 7.2.1, Participating in Non-Interscholastic Programs- Team Sports, when the student-athletes participated in an alumni game while a members of the school team.  In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the students ineligible for the school’s next two regular season contests.
  1. Bluffton High School had a student-athlete in junior varsity/varsity football and a student-athlete in girls junior varsity/varsity soccer violate Bylaw 4-4-1, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10-2-5, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contests in which the ineligible students participated. However, no forfeitures were required since the school did not win the two football contests or the four soccer contests in which the ineligible students participated, respectively.
  1. Cincinnati Princeton High School had multiple student-athletes in varsity football, junior varsity football, and boys varsity soccer violate Bylaw 4-4-1, Scholarship. The school also had a student-athlete in varsity volleyball violate Bylaw 4-7-2, Transfer. In accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which these ineligible students participated. The school also had four student-athletes in varsity football violate Bylaw 4-7-2, Transfer. However, three of the students met Exception 1 to the Bylaw (parent’s move into the district) and one of the students met Exception 9 to the Bylaw (one time transfer into the school located in the district of residence of the parent) but the school permitted the students to participate prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the students retroactively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4-1-1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  1. Cincinnati Princeton Community Middle School had a student-athlete in junior high football violate Sports Regulation 7.2.1, Participating in Non-Interscholastic Programs- Team Sports, when the student-athlete participated in a non-school contest while a member of the school team.  In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the student ineligible for the school’s next regular season contest. Furthermore, in accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the one victorious contest in which the student participated after the infraction occurred but before the penalty was assessed.
  1. Dayton Wright Brothers Middle School had a student-athlete in 8th grade volleyball violate Bylaw 4-4-5, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated. However, no forfeitures were required since the school did not win the three contests in which the ineligible student participated.
  1. Dayton Belmont High School had a student-athlete in girls varsity cross country violate Bylaw 4-4-1, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any of the three contests in which the ineligible student participated and in which the school was victorious.
  1. Cleveland John Marshall High School had a student-athlete in boys varsity soccer and a student-athlete in varsity football violate Bylaw 4-3-1, Enrollment and Attendance. In accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any of the three soccer contests and the three football contests in which the ineligible students participated and in which the school was victorious.
  1. Cleveland Glenville High School had multiple student-athletes violate Bylaw 4-3-1, Enrollment and Attendance, when the district inaccurately assigned students attending a non-traditional school sponsored by the district to the wrong high school for athletic participation opportunities. However, the students, who were improperly assigned, are substantively eligible for participation in accordance with Bylaw 4-3-1, Exception 4, just not at Glenville High School. Therefore, the students are permitted to continue their participation through this current fall sports season with the understanding that they shall be reassigned beginning with the next sport season to their correct high school, which is the one closest to their residence. However, in accordance with Bylaw 3, Administrative Responsibility and Institutional Control, the following penalties are assessed: 1. Glenville High School shall be removed from the 2018 OHSAA Boys Football Tournament because of the participation of students who have been improperly assigned to that school. 2. Glenville High School shall be on probation for the next three years through the 2020-21 school year. This means that any further infractions of this nature shall place the school’s membership in jeopardy. 3. The Cleveland Metropolitan School District is publicly reprimanded for a lack of administrative responsibility and institutional control for failure to implement these business rules. 4. The CMSD is fined $5,000 for these administrative errors. 5. The central office staff and building administrators at each of the member high schools shall be required to participate in continuing education with the OHSAA compliance staff each year of the three-year probationary period.
  1. Brooklyn High School had a student-athlete in boys varsity varsity soccer violate Sports Regulation 7.2.1, Participating in Non-Interscholastic Programs-Team Sports, when the student-athlete participated in a non-interscholastic soccer contests while a member of the school team.  In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the student ineligible for the school’s next two contests. Furthermore, in accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the student participated after the infraction occurred but before the penalty was assessed. However, no forfeitures were required since the school did not win the contests in which the student participated following his participation in the non-interscholastic activity but before the penalty was assessed.
  1. Columbus Whetstone High School had 22 student-athletes in numerous sports violate Bylaw 4-8-1, International Students. However, the students met Exception 1 to the Bylaw (parent’s living in the district) but the school permitted the students to participate prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the students retroactively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4-1-1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  1. Columbus East High School had a student-athlete in varsity football violate Bylaw 4-8-1, International Students. However, the student met Exception 1 to the Bylaw (parent’s living in the district) but the school permitted the student to participate prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the students retroactively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4-1-1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  1. Malvern High School’s head football coach violated the Return to Play Concussion Protocol when he attempted to return a player to a contest after the player was removed by the officials in accordance with both OHSAA regulations and Ohio state law. In accordance with Bylaw 11, Penalties, the coach is publically reprimanded, and he and the Malvern football program are placed on probation through the 2019 football season. This means that any reoccurrence of this type of violation will require more severe penalties, both institutional and on the head coach himself.
  1. Ottawa-Glandorf High School had a student-athlete in boys junior varsity soccer violate Bylaw 4-4-4, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the nine contests in which the ineligible student participated and in which the school was victorious.
  1. Arlington High School had a student-athlete in girls varsity volleyball violate Volleyball Sports Regulation 1.1.6, Individual Limitations, when the student-athlete participated in sub-varsity competition then entered and played in a sixth set during the varsity match that same day. In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  1. Cincinnati Colerain High School had a student-athlete in boys varsity soccer violate Bylaw 4-8-1, International Students. However, the student met Exception 1 to the Bylaw (parent’s living in the district) but the school permitted the student to participate in four contests prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the students retroactively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4-1-1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  1. Hamilton Ross Middle School had a student-athlete in junior high volleyball violate Sports Regulation 7.2.1, Participating in Non-Interscholastic Programs-Team Sports, when the student-athlete participated in a CYO tryout while a member of the school team.  In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the student ineligible for the school’s next two contests. Furthermore, in accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the student participated after the infraction occurred but before the penalty was assessed. However, no forfeitures were required since the student did not participate in any contests following her participation in the non-interscholastic activity and before the penalty was assessed.
  1. Columbus Indianola K-8 Junior High School had a student-athlete in boys junior high soccer violate Sports Regulation 7.2.1, Participating in Non-Interscholastic Programs-Team Sports, when the student-athlete participated in a non-interscholastic event while a member of the school team.  In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the student ineligible for the school’s next two contests. Furthermore, in accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the two victorious contests in which the student participated after the infraction occurred but before the penalty was assessed.
  1. Cincinnati Winton Woods High School’s assistant football coach violated Bylaw 4-9-1, Recruiting, when he met with the custodian of a student who was not enrolled at Winton Woods High School and tried to influence the enrollment of the student into Winton Woods High School. In accordance with Bylaw 11, Penalties, the following penalties have been assessed: 1) The coach shall be suspended from coaching football in the 2018 OHSAA football tournament, should Winton Woods qualify for participation. 2) The coach is permitted to have only 8 days of the permissible 10 days of contact with football players who are part of the Winton Woods football program from June 1-July 31, 2019. 3) Winton Woods shall provide education to all coaching staff regarding the OHSAA recruiting bylaw. The school district shall provide a written summary of these education efforts to the OHSAA compliance staff.
  1. Barberton High School’s head football coach violated General Sports Regulation/Media Regulations Section 3B, Coaches’ and Participants’ Comments to the News Media, when he publicly criticized officials. In accordance with Bylaw 11, Penalties, the coach was suspended for the next regular season varsity football contest and was fined $150.
  1. Fremont St. Joseph Central Catholic High School had a student-athlete in boys freshman and junior varsity basketball violate Bylaw 4-3-1, Enrollment and Attendance, over a two-year period. In accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1 and Bylaw 10-2-5, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit all victorious contests in which the ineligible student participated. In addition, the school was also fined $250 for the lack of institutional control.
  1. Haviland Wayne Trace High School’s baseball coaching staff violated Sports Regulation 7.5.1, 10-day summer coaching limitation, when they conducted 13 days of summer coaching during June 1-July 31, 2018.  In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office reduced the Wayne Trace’s summer coaching days to eight for the 2019 summer period.
  1. Reynoldsburg High School had a student-athlete in junior varsity football violate Bylaw 4-7-2, Transfer. In accordance with Bylaw 10-2-1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated. However, no forfeitures were required since the school did not win the contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  1. Cincinnati West Clermont High School had a student-athlete violate Bylaw 4-1-2, Falsification, and, in accordance with the bylaw the Executive Director’s office applied the appropriate penalty and ruled that the student shall be ineligible for the last two regular season contests and the OHSAA tournament in the sport of football. Furthermore, due to the timing of the student’s transfer, the student shall also be held accountable to the 2017-18 transfer consequence of sitting out the first half of the maximum allowable regular season contests in any other sport in which the student should desire to participate during the 2018-19 school year, regardless of the student’s past participation in the sport.
  1. Willard High School had a student-athlete violate Bylaw 4-1-2, Falsification, and, in accordance with the bylaw the Executive Director’s office applied the appropriate penalty and ruled that the student shall fulfill a six-game regular season penalty in the sport of basketball in addition to sitting out the postseason tournament in that sport. If the student desires to participate in any other sport in which he did not participate during the 2017-18 school year, there is no falsification penalty.
  1. Cedarville High School had a student-athlete violate Bylaw 4-1-2, Falsification, and, in accordance with the bylaw the Executive Director’s office applied the appropriate penalty and ruled that the student shall fulfill a two-game regular season penalty in the sport of football and an eight-game regular season penalty in the sport of baseball, in addition to sitting out each of those respective sports’ postseason tournaments. If the student desires to participate in any other sport in which he did not participate during the 2017-18 school year, there is no falsification penalty.
  1. Kettering Archbishop Alter High School violated Bylaw 4-9-2 and Bylaw 4-9-4 #7, Recruiting, when it failed to fully vet a situation where an outside entity was providing scholarships to student-athletes who participated in a basketball program and who decided to attend Alter High School.  In accordance with Bylaw 4-9-7 and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office issued the following sanctions: 1) The student-athletes currently enrolled at Alter High School who were beneficiaries of this scholarship program are required to relinquish the scholarship monies paid by the outside entity for their tuition at Alter; 2) The 2018 recipients of this scholarship, who have yet to be paid, are not permitted to receive their scholarship monies if they want to maintain full eligibility; 3) Alter is publicly reprimanded for failure to fully vet this situation with the OHSAA Compliance staff and is placed on probation through the remainder of the 2018-19 school year; 4) Alter High School is required to alert the outside entity that the scholarship program is only permitted to be continued if the scholarships are awarded to each student regardless of their high school selection.
  1. Columbus Bishop Ready High School had a student-athlete in varsity volleyball violate Volleyball Sport Regulation 1.1.5, Match Limitations, when she participated in excess of the maximum allowable number of permitted regular season matches (22) in the sport of volleyball. In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the student ineligible for the OHSAA tournament. Furthermore, in accordance with Bylaw 10-2-5, Forfeitures, the school must also forfeit the one victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated after she exceeded the number of permitted contests.
  1. Brookpark Middle School failed to respond to an ejection report in accordance with General Sport Regulation 13, Ejection Procedures for Schools. In accordance with General Sport Regulation 13, Brookpark has been fined $150.
  1. Zane Trace High School failed to respond to an ejection report in accordance with General Sport Regulation 13, Ejection Procedures for Schools. In accordance with General Sport Regulation 13, Zane Trace has been fined $150. 
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